evangelism


 

Great counsel from Jonathan Edwards’ classic Religious Affections

Forward to Christ

Forward to Christ 

When a newly-converted young lady from Connecticut wrote Jonathan Edwards a letter in 1741 seeking advice on growth in godliness and assurance, the venerable theologian wrote back and offered words that might be unconscionable in popular evangelical circles today.

Essentially, Edwards told her, “Don’t look back.”

In point 10 of his 17-point answer, Edwards advised the young matron regarding “times when you fall into doubts about the state of your soul” as follows:

It is proper to review your past experience; but do not consume too much time and strength in this way; rather apply yourself, with all your might, to an earnest pursuit after renewed experience, new light, and new lively acts of faith and love. One new discovery of the glory of Christ’s face, will do more toward scattering clouds of darkness in one minute, than examining old experience, by the best marks that can be given, through a whole year.[1]

For Edwards, “looking back” did little or nothing to imbue the believer with unshakable assurance of salvation. Edwards held that the believer must, by God’s grace, persevere in bearing fruit and then the evidence of a sanctified life would effectively assure the believer of his or her standing before God. Edwards understood the apostle Paul’s letter to the Philippians and how he spoke of “forgetting what lies behind and reaching forward to what lies ahead:” the Christian pilgrimage is not a fifty-yard dash, but a rigorous marathon, fraught with obstacles and alternative dead-end paths. To stay such a treacherous course, Christians need objective marks of conversion, thus Edwards’ admonition for the young lady to apply herself to “new lively acts of faith and love.”

Read entire article by Jeff Robinson

By focusing on The Day of Pentecost, we are enabled to begin to see the place of God’s Spirit in the entire Redemptive Plan. It keeps us rightly related to the Christ Event- all that the Incarnation itself has to do with God’s purpose to redeem a People for Himself through the work of His only begotten Son, begotten and anointed by the Holy Spirit.

But the Day itself, emphasizes that it is as the Spirit of Christ, now sent down to earth to indwell the Church, that God’s work of the application of redemption is inaugurated in these “last days” among the nations. We simply cannot afford to ignore the meaning then of the Day of Pentecost and all that it should mean in the life of the churches.

A highly recommended essay by A.J.Gordon of Boston (1894) is the one entitled, “The Embodying of the Spirit”.

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Finally, an essay on the gospel that envisions the whole church!

Came across this essay from Tim Keller & decided it was just too good to keep to myself. I’ve expressed my conviction re. what I believe is the all too common penchant in the churches & on social media to promote forms of a “truncated” gospel of the New Testament.

There is much talk about the “new evangelization” among Catholics as well as Protestants. What is needed is this sort of listening to the whole church and the varied contributions to this vital area that belongs to the very essence of the Christian life & faith – diversity in evangelism. Bookmark the pdf or better yet, download for your resource file on your reader.

related post – The Love of God for All Humankind by Errol Hulse

If you have rejected an incomplete form of the gospel of JESUS in the past, you may want to read this and rethink your response.Yes,  rethink is possible!