Restoring Unity is what the Christian Message is all about!

Christ's Message to the churches (Revelation)

In the first century churches, the first generation, there was already considerable misunderstanding about the essence of the Church which Christ was building & nurturing- His Kingdom community. Much of the Apostle Paul’s ministry as the Apostle to the Gentiles, had to deal with opposition from the Palestinian churches and their leaders. It should come as no surprise to those who read their Bible that much of his writings include elements of this division and his attempts to heal them. In his letter to the Ephesians it is the major theme- the purpose of God’s pleasure to “unite in Christ all things”; but it is also an integral part of his letter to the house churches of Rome.

In the last century, missional leaders from many diverse church traditions saw that our divisions were directly affecting our task in the world and that the time had come to move the theme of unity to the front burner of our efforts. This effort came to be known as the ecumenical movement and many gains were made by those that participated. But many churches, because of convictions, did not participate. Some condemned the efforts outright, some observed at a distance.

In the new century, much has changed for the churches; or has it? We find ourselves still in the midst of the same world with the same assignment from our King: preach the Gospel of the Kingdom of Jesus Christ, make disciples of all nations, and above all, live out the new life Christ has inaugurated. Some refer to a “new” ecumenism because it seems that many of those that were not officially a part of the “older” effort want to be distinguished from them. I personally feel this is wrong-headed and counter-productive to the very thing we’re focused on -unity. I love, respect, and esteem some of those who were leaders in bringing into being the World Council of Churches.

I just happen to be reading another book written by W.A.Visser’t Hooft, the first General Secretary, who served the churches with love and dedication for many years. Like another of his books, The Pressure of Our Common Calling, which I posted about earlier, this is a sound theological basis for the Church’s mission, edification, and unity. It is about the perennial importance of renewal grounded in the very character of the Church of God as the new creation in Christ.

I want to quote him at the place where he emphasizes that the whole Church-all the churches, must heed the imperatives addressed to the new creation. To me that means we can never settle for anything less than Biblical unity and diligently work towards that as a goal, knowing that it will come at the consumation of our redemption in Christ.

The need of the whole Church for repentance and renewal is most clearly shown in the second and third chapters of the Book of Revelation. It has often been pointed out that the seven churches to whom the letters are addressed represented the most flourishing part of the Church at that time. But more important is that according to the symbolic language of the author the seven churches clearly represent the Church as a whole. For seven is the figure of totality.

In these letters the whole Church is addressed. This is underlined by the fact that each letter is concluded by the solemn warning: “He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the churches”. The warning and promise received by each church is meant to be overheard and passed on by other churches and so to reach the whole Church.

Now it is significant that five of the seven letters are in the nature of calls to repentance. For that means that the Church as such is called to live the life of metanoia, of constant readiness to turn away from the path of this world and to let herself be renewed. And once again it is clear that renewal means living by the power of the new age. In the letter to the Church in Sardis repentance is identified with awakening (3:2,3). To be awake is to be ready for the Day of the Lord. ‘ Lo, I am coming like a thief. Blessed is he who is awake’ (16:15).

The churches are called to remember from what they have fallen (2:5) or what they have received and heard (3:3). That is to say they are to realize again that they represent the new creation. If they do, if they turn resolutely away from the old age, then they will receive the new name (2:17 and 3:12) and be counted as belonging to the new Jerusalem (3:12). Such a metanoia is in this world never a completed process; it is to be actualized and implemented every day anew. – The Renewal of The Church, p.47 (1956)

Restoring or renewing the unity of the Church of Christ is never easy work. Church history for almost 2000 years will tell us that. But progress in recent decades has been made- perhaps more than at any other time. This is what our Lord intends and if we are serious about following Him, we have no other path. Unity is not optional for the Church nor for any indivdual Christian. All of us must make it a part of our prayers and efforts by the grace of God and for His fame on earth. This season of Eastertide is a great time to make this a priority in our spiritual journey of faith.

see “Reasons for Neglecting God’s priority

My favorite interpretation of Mary’s Magnificat.

Gospel of Saint Luke, Chapter 1

44 For behold, when the sound of your greeting came to my ears, the baby in my womb leaped for joy. 45 And blessed is she who believed that there would be [1] a fulfillment of what was spoken to her from the Lord.”

Mary’s Song of Praise: The Magnificat

46 And Mary said,

“My soul magnifies the Lord,
47 and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior,
48 for he has looked on the humble estate of his servant.
For behold, from now on all generations will call me blessed;
49 for he who is mighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his name.
50 And his mercy is for those who fear him
from generation to generation.
51 He has shown strength with his arm;
he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts;
52 he has brought down the mighty from their thrones
and exalted those of humble estate;
53 he has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.
54 He has helped his servant Israel,
in remembrance of his mercy,
55 as he spoke to our fathers,
to Abraham and to his offspring forever.”

Related post: Read the First Encyclical Letter of Pope Benedict XVI, 25 Dec. 2005

The Old  Zion Red Church- Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania

On our drive to New York city last week for Navy Fleet week, we finally took a short side trip that we’ve wanted to do for a long time. We went by to see where my first generation maternal ancestor lived and began his family after arriving on board the ship at Philadelphia. The record of his wedding as well as the births of his first three children were recorded in the ministerial records of this church in Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania, before the Revolutionary War.

The Red Church is in the Blue Mountains and has had four buildings. The first one in the early 1700’s, the present one which was built in 1887. Over the door is a marker identifying it as Evangelical Lutheran and Reformed. Lorentz Jung only lived here seven or eight years after his marriage before heading south into Virginia where he changed his name to Lawrence Young.

I couldn’t help but get a little emotional as I poured out a grateful heart for such a rich spiritual heritage from the first generation in America. But I realize that such a spirtual pedigree does not guarantee us an inheritance apart from a living faith in the Christ of the Scriptures. Like Esau of old, we can squander our inheritance, exchange it for a bowl of fleshly pottage.

Grandparents Henry and Jesse Young (1906)

I was reminded again in New York city in reference to the Marble Collegiate Church of the Dutch Reformed tradition and Trinity Episcopal Church, both which predate the American Revolution, that the witness of the Gospel of Christ has been present in every generation of Americans. It has been the “open secret” that was either ignored or embraced as God’s testimony of redeeming love.

We came home from New York city impressed with the extent that the city embraced the men and women of the armed services during Fleet week. And we came home with a renewed testimony that the churches of the new century continuing to faithfully live out the faith of our Fathers. Our only question is to what degree are multitudes in America squandering their spiritual inheritance?

See my post last year on “A Night to Remember” .

Confessions of A Liberal Christian Churchman.

I really didn’t have to listen to our President’s State of The Union address to get that it was about the “ECONOMY”. So what’s new in 80 years of progress- from 1930 to 2010?

In trying to live up to the “prophetic” part of the E4Unity blog, I went in search of a prophetic voice from the 20th century and found this tasty morsel from Paul S.Minear. As I started reading this essay which was written in 1980, I was blown away by what he said about his experience and convictions about the hard times of the 1930’s.

Paul S. Minear 1980

“In 1930 I was at Yale, beginning my graduate study of the Bible. The Great Depression was in its early stages; it would be ended only by World War II with its employment of millions of the unemployed, and with its armaments’ explosion and the subsequent development of the military- industrial-technological empire.
 But in 1930, millions were unemployed and hungry. There was immeasurable destitution, disillusionment, despair. The American dream had turned overnight into the American nightmare. Political anarchy and economic civil war were daily possibilities. There were explosive demands for economic justice; each of these demands touched off reactionary forces that were in a position to use the powers of government to fend off any substantive change in the social structure.
In New Haven, I was in constant contact with workers’ families whose only protection from extinction was to stand in endless breadlines or to work the streets peddling apples or pencils. I was kept from sharing their plight by the fact that I was a student, and my wife was in the employ of the university.
 The Depression signalled a cold war between economic royalists and radicals, both seeking to use the powers of government to fulfill self-interests. No one can tell how near the country came to revolution, but it was near enough to create an anti-Communist hysteria from which the nation has never since been free. To a great degree the cold war between America and Russia has been one of a pair of identical twins: the other twin being the internal cold war within America, between left and right.
What role in this struggle was played by Christian congregations? Two answers can be given. (1) The life of congregations appeared to be totally irrelevant to the solution of the critical issues. Nothing they did, or could do, had the slightest effect. (2) When congregations did take up positions, they lined up solidly on the side of economic and political reaction. Right-wing forces could count on their fears of radical change. The acronym WASP was an accurate symbol of actual collusion between religious and political establishments. Or so it seemed to me. This collusion was nowhere more obvious than in those sections of the country where Protestantism was, in effect, the state religion.

And the Bible? In many ways, the Bible appeared to be wholly irrelevant to finding ways of dealing with the successive crises. But where it did become relevant, it was in support of the collusion between religious and political establishments. The more reactionary the congregation, the more it gave recognition to the authority of the Bible. Loyalty to the Bible contributed directly to loyalty to Mammon, to Mars, to Caesar. “Bible-Belt” became a term referring to a region simultaneously super- patriotic, economically reactionary, militaristic, anti-union, and racially exclusive. All these were solidly identified with Christianity, and this Christianity was solidly identified with the Bible.

In 1930, I was convinced that before Christian congregations could be emancipated from such idolatries, their dependence on the Bible must be dynamited. I held the authority of the Bible at least partly responsible for the stance of the churches; therefore that authority must be undermined.”

 

Excerpt from “The Bible’s Authority in The Churches”.

Full text available as Authority-in-the-Churches

 

from Meditation 17, By John Donne
Nunc Lento Sonitu Dicunt, Morieris

 
Perchance he for whom this bell tolls may be so ill as that he know not it tolls for him; and perchance I may think myself so much better than I am, as that they who are about me and see my state may have caused it to toll for me, and I know not that.
The church is catholic, universal, so are all her actions; all that she does, belongs to all. When she baptizes a child, that action concerns me; for that child is thereby connected to that body which is my head too, and ingrafted into that body whereof I am a member. And when she buries a man, that action concerns me: all mankind is of one author and is one volume; when one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language; and every chapter must be so translated. God employs several translators; some pieces are translated by age, some by sickness, some by war, some by justice; but God’s hand is in every translation, and his hand shall bind up all our scattered leaves again for that library where every book shall lie open to one another.

(posted in memory of Sandra Cathryn Overby Ward-1942-2009)

 

 

 

On the heels of the last post about the SBC, I want to quickly add my own conviction why that denomination has been blessed as it has despite the internal-battles of the last 50 years. Frankly, it is what keeps me identified with this wing of the Church.

It is simply that it has been able to keep the world mission as the unifying task of what the Convention is about year after year. By the way, SBC stands for Southern Baptist Convention, a fellowship of autonomous local churches.

To give you a taste of how important this is to me and I believe to the cause of Jesus Christ on earth, I want to quote from an outstanding missionary to Islam in another denomination-the oldest continous protestant  denomination in the USA-the Reformed Church in America:

Over the entrance of one of the university buildings in Upsala (Switzerland) is the inscription- ‘Free thought is great but true thought is better’. There is great freedom of thought on missions today. The globe-trotter, the newspaper reporter, and the man on the street do not hesitate to express their opinions on missions and missionaries. The youth of today, untrammeled by the older traditions or conventions, is free to express its conclusions. A leader among the present generation of students, when cautioned regarding the humanistic trend and syncretistic philosophy in missions wrote: “I am personally not the least interested in modernist propaganda. The battle has passed wholly beyond that front for me. Modern life and my own life crack the universe clear open to its very core and make me face issues a thousand fathoms beneath those of the modernist and fundamentalist controversy. . .as a teacher I am not at all concerned with what any man thinks but only that he thinks.”

This is a familiar attitude and there is considerable truth in the contention. But if “the universe is cracked clear open to its very core” and we are to think at all correctly, conclusively, and creatively regarding it and the Kingdom of God, we need first of all to gird the loins of our mind with truth. In the battle against error there is no weapon so powerful as the sword of the Spirit which is the Word of God. – Samuel Zwemer, Thinking Missions with Christ (1934)

My personal message to fellow members of the SBC would be along the above lines-in the 21st century, the only safe way forward is to think missions exactly as Zwemer is advocating here, as the unifying purpose of our continuing partnership.

Read an excerpt from an earlier book (1911), The Glory of the Impossible

Zwemer biography at HISTORY of MISSIOLOGY, Boston University

How the Gospel of the Kingdom Produces Missional Apologetics                                        johnarmstrong

April 6, 2009 newsletter
John H. Armstrong

The Bible is a book of truly big ideas. We often miss the really “big ideas” because we spend too much time on the lesser ones, often the ideas that we enjoy debating with other Christians. If we are to become missional apologists then this all has to change, sooner than later. I believe we must return to the one really big idea of the gospel of the kingdom.

But here is the problem-we assume that we all know the gospel. (I want to challenge this assumption as long as I live.) We think the gospel is simple (it is in one profound sense)-it is good news about getting our sins forgiven if we personally trust Jesus to save us. You know, “Invite Christ into your heart and get your sin problem solved so you can go to heaven when you die.” The problem, of course, is that this is not the gospel of the kingdom at all. . .

When Jesus began to teach in the synagogues, and heal the sick, he “proclaimed the good news of the kingdom” (Matthew 4:23). The gospel means, in its simple essence, good news. The good news, in short form, is God’s provision of complete salvation through the life, death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

When the writers of the four Gospels wanted to report that the gospel was being preached they said things like this: “The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!” (Mark 1:15). Jesus even spoke of the necessity that was placed upon him to “proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God” (Luke 4:43).

Some have argued, falsely I believe, that this kingdom of God/good news connection is not found in the Fourth Gospel. (Some even once argued that the gospel of the kingdom was for the Jews, not for the rest of us. Thankfully this idea is almost totally dead.) But consider this about the Fourth Gospel-the most oft-quoted of all texts about new life in the gospel is found in John 3 where Jesus spoke to Nicodemus about his need for birth from above. Here our Lord says, “No one can see the kingdom of God without being born again” (John 3:3) and later “No one can enter the kingdom of God without being born of water and the Spirit” (John 3:5). The point here is obvious. Being born of God, and believing the good news, amounts to seeing and entering the kingdom of God. The new birth and the kingdom are intimately connected.

Though the Pauline epistles speak far more often of the gospel without this kingdom link, the same message is still found there. At least sixteen times Paul writes about “inheriting” or “living in” the kingdom through the good news of grace. And the writer of Hebrews, the second letter of Peter and James all refer to “the kingdom” as well. The Apocalypse even says that God “has made us to be a kingdom” (Revelation 5:10). Make no mistake about this-our loss of this emphasis on the gospel and the kingdom is not small. In fact, so far as I can tell, this might be the most important loss to the message of the good news in the modern era.

Social Gospel, Spiritual Gospel, or the “Gospel of the Kingdom

In the 19th century a great debate arose in the Christian church about the gospel. Some argued that what was missing in the era of great revivals, and the later post-Protestant developments in church history, was the social gospel. By this they had in mind the fact that the gospel spoke to things like justice, mercy and concern for the poor. Many evangelicals saw danger in this social emphasis and reacted. They defended the biblical truth that the gospel was about sin and forgiveness, about grace and personal salvation. The great tragedy was that this debate not only divided the church but it radically altered the way people heard and understood the most important message ever given to humankind.

What was the cause of this loss? I believe the answer lies in this question of understanding the nature of the gospel of the kingdom. When we pit personal forgiveness against the transforming power of the good news to change lives, through God-given repentance, we have missed the point. The gospel of grace changes us and changes everything around us. This is not a private message. It is a public declaration of what has been done in Jesus Christ. It is a message that announces to the whole world that God “through him [Christ] . . . reconciled to himself all things” (Colossians 1:20).

When we make the gospel exclusively about private forgiveness, without the call of God to share in reconciliation and transformation in the world, we invent a privatized message that does not transform people and cultures. This message has no connection to the kingdom, which is the actual context of all forgiveness and personal salvation. In avoiding the “works” paradigm many evangelicals have actually created a gospel that is detached from the life, death and resurrection of Jesus. We have lost the gospel of the kingdom.

When Simon the Sorcerer professed faith (we wonder if his faith was real in light of what follows in the story) Luke records that Philip had been proclaiming “the good news of the kingdom of God” (Acts 8:12). When people believed this same gospel they were baptized. Later in Acts we read that the gospel was preached in many cities and new disciples were told that they would have to go through many hardships “to enter the kingdom of God” (Act 14:22). But even more persuasive is the text in Acts 19:8. Here we read that Paul entered the synagogue in Ephesus and “spoke boldly for three months, arguing persuasively about the kingdom of God.” Do you not see it? We would think this text should say that he argued about the gospel. But Luke has no hesitation at all in equating the proclamation of the good news with the reality of the kingdom of God itself.

An Authentic Kingdom Community

One can rightly deduce, from reading the whole of Scripture, that the church is not identical with the kingdom of God but the community that we call the church exists to serve that kingdom. The church expands the kingdom’s impact throughout the whole world. Simply put, the gospel-and thus the church-are always directly related to the kingdom. We have separated them and this has created nothing short of spiritual chaos.

People made in God’s image long for relationships. Having lost their relationship with God through sin they have lost all deeply satisfying relationships with their fellow human beings. All the unrest and social breakdown in the family and society is the result of this brokenness. But the gospel of the kingdom restores broken relationships, with both God and people.

Genuine loving relationships, in which trust and respect are central, are desired by all people. This is a part of that “God-shaped vacuum” we have heard about. And this is why the greatest apologetic of all is missional, or communal. People cannot function as they were made by God without relationships. This is why they gravitate to bars, civic clubs, college fraternities and sororities, sports teams, Gay Pride groups, Internet chat rooms and hundreds of other expressions of human community. And this is why the church fails to present the gospel of the kingdom effectively when it is ceases to be a unique community of people living eternal life in loving relationships.

The fullness of the kingdom of God must be preached and it must be demonstrated. This is not an either/or, but rather a both/and. The best apology that we can give to people today is to show them the implications of the kingdom of God at work in a healthy church. This is why the evil one attacks the church the way he does. He does not need to attack the world. The world already does what it does because they follow him. He attacks the church (cf. Ephesians 6, which refers to spiritual warfare in corporate ways, not private ones) because if the church fails to preach and live the gospel of the kingdom then there is no apologetic that can draw the world to the church.

Conclusion

The generation born since 1965 longs for community more than any I have ever encountered. I am not surprised by this given the impact of modernity and consumerism. I believe the answer to this is missional apologetics.

Put more simply, the answer is found in loving communities that are involved in the real lives of deeply broken people. The staple of kingdom/gospel ministry will always be intentional spiritual friendships. Let me put this as plainly as I know how:

No Christian should ever be without at least one intentional and significant relationship with a non-Christian.

Note, I did not say every Christian is an evangelist. Nor did I say that every Christian is to be a trained apologist. (A careful study of Colossians 4:2-6 will dispossess you of this faulty, but all too popular, notion.)

I have known several Christians who left other religions to become followers of Christ. One, a Muslim, told me time and again that the one factor that drew him to become a Christ follower was the love that he saw in Christians for one another. Several studies of the reasons why Muslims convert to Christ show the same thing. It is not our ability to convince them that Mohammed is a false teacher, or even that the Koran is dangerous, that ultimately wins them to Christ. It is their seeing us living in a love that they cannot and do not know.

The great early church theologian Tertullian said this so well: “It is the Christian’s way of life that shows the validity of his beliefs: goodness is their identifying characteristic” (cited by William Dyrness, Christian Apologetics in a World Community, 28).

(I usually don’t post excerps from others in such detail, but this was so good and fit in with my recent posts and conversation with some that I made an exception. John Armstrong is a very dear friend,Director of ACT3 ministries. He teaches a course in Missional Apologetics at the Billy Graham School of Evangelism at Wheaton College).E4Unity

To follow the Four Part Series-Here

yearofpaul

I’ve been having a great time posting on the “Year of St.Paul” and responding to the invitation of Pope Benedict to study afresh with the Catholic Church the contribution this Apostle makes to Christianity.

I have learned many things not only from the Biblical texts but have also learned of the Apostle’s influence on the Catholic renewal that has been going on for some time and is especially seen in the council known as Vatican II. But June 29 is coming around soon and I am hoping to choose another theme that will keep me busy.

EDINBURGH 1910-2010  appears to be a very good candidate. Click here to see the intended outcomes.

In 1910 the first world conference on Protestant Missions was held and this remarkable event led to much of the activity in the 20th century churches not only for world-wide expansion but for the related emphasis on the Biblical theme of UNITY. In fact this conference led directly to the eventual founding of the World Council of Churches. It was a very significant event coming as it did as the build-up for World War I was already underway by many of the same countries that the delegates came from. There is much to review about the first conference and what has happened in Protestant mission since.

Preparations for the Cenntenial celebrations are already far along with four major conferences planned around the world. The excitement is building among the churches and it has caught me in its wave. If you want to inform yourself of some of the things we will have to blog about check-out EDINBURGH 2010:Remembering the past, redefining the future.

The Chief Temptation of CHRIST’S CHURCH forsyth

It was what still makes, and always has made, the chief temptation of his Church — the reformation of society by every beneficent means except the evangelical (The Gospel); by amelioration, by reorganization, by programes, and policies, instead of by the soul’s new creation, and its total conversion from the passion for justice to the faith of grace, from what makes men just with each other to what makes them just with God.

It was the temptation to save men by rallying their goodness without routing their evil, by reorganizing virtue instead of redeeming guilt. …It is the error which leads men to think that we can have a new Church or Humanity upon any other condition than the renovation in the soul of the new covenant which Christ founded in his last hours, before the very Church was founded, and which is the Church’s one foundation in his most precious blood. — P.T. Forsyth

ESSAY on THE PRECISE PROBLEM TODAY , from The Work of Christ, an incredible contribution to celebrating the UNITY of The CHURCH.

A classic on PREACHING CHRIST, by Charles McIlvaine “Nothing in this world could I rejoice in so much as to be instrumental, under God’s grace, in promoting the spiritual excellency and efficacy of your work and your personal growth in the faith and love of Christ.” (Ohio 1863)

 

 

Did you ever hear the old saying,

DYNAMITE SOMETIMES COMES IN SMALL PACKAGES

I’m thinking especially about books that have made an impact on my life. Some of the most powerful books have been little paperbacks. I have a dear friend that is an avid reader, and that’s putting it mildly. He once said to me, “I don’t do paperbacks!” But I said, there are some precious little gems that only come in paperback. “Well”, he said, “I guess I’ll just have to wait until the hardback edition comes out, won’t I.”

Some of my most treasured books over the years are paperback classics, I’ll just name three: Life Together, by Dietrich Bonhoeffer,Harper & Row (1954), 122 pages,and The Obedience of Faith, by Paul S.Minear, SCM Press (1971)110 pages. I wish every Christian in America could read these as well as the third one I’ll mention now, regardless of which church tradition they call mother kirk.

The third little treasure is a little book on the church, Body Life, written by Pastor Ray Stedman in 1972, and telling the story of the Peninsula Bible Church in Palo Alto, California. The basic message of this little book and what it represents is still dynamite today. The Church, PBC, and their vibrant ministries are a testament to that.  

 He makes this statement in the early part of the book after discussing many of the negative ideas that come to mind when the word “church” is mentioned: 

“Let’s be honest: The church has been all of these things at one time or another. Again and again, it has justified every bitter charge, every gripe and criticism that was ever leveled against it by angry atheists and disillusioned agnostics.

“Yet–despite all its obvious flaws, weaknesses, hypocrisies, sins, and excesses–the church has been the most powerful force for good on the face of the earth, century after century, from the time of the apostles right up to this present moment. It has been light in the midst of the blackest darkness. It has been salt–both a preservative and a delightful seasoning–in a corruption-prone, unsavory society.”

He goes on to ask the obvious question, “How can this be?” And his answer is one we need to ponder very very carefully today when the world desparately needs what only the “True Church” was designed to provide.(see my earlier post on,”I Belong To The One True Church“.

Two Churches

How can we unravel this paradox? How can the church be both sin-ridden and salt and light? How can the church be both a source of disillusionment and a source of illumination at the same time? The answer, as found in the Bible, is this: What we call “the church” is really two churches! One is selfish, power-hungry, and sinful. The other is loving, forgiving, and godly. One has a long history of stirring up hatred, conflict, and bloody persecution, all in the name of God and religion. The other has always sought to heal human hurts, break down barriers of race and class, and deliver men and women from their guilt, shame, fear, and ignorance.

One is a false church, a counterfeit, masquerading as Christianity, but whose head is Satan. The other is the true church, founded by Jesus Christ, mirroring His authentic character through acts of love, self-sacrifice, courage, and truth.

Well there you have the gist of what I really believe about the Church and all of her many different manifestations and the urgent task of unity. To read more of this chapter from the late Dr.Stedman’s book, go here.